Interview with Cecilia Nobre

Cecilia Nobre, Commuter bus classroom, Conferences, DELTA, EFL, Second Language Acquisition, Teacher training, Teachers' Stoires, Uncategorized
In this episode of the TEFL show Robert William McCaul interviews Cecilia Nobre,  an ESOL teacher, a regular conference speaker and blogger, about a novel way she was involved in to learn English on that long commute to work!
We also chat about her experiences as a language learner & how she managed to learn English so well, why she’s learning Czech now and how she’s helping non-native English teachers improve their proficiency.
Cecilia, from Brazil, has been teaching since 1999. She graduated with a BA in Portuguese and English and went on to live in the UK for 3 years where she taught Portuguese. She’s done a postgraduate course in English and she’s been teaching 1:1 online for 3 months and is developing her career as an online teacher. She is particularly interested in materials design and applying Corpus L in ELT contexts (classroom and digital materials)
She also chose and developed the materials for ‘English on the Road’ (Business Result by Oxford and I created the course syllabus)
See the commuter bus/ classroom news report (in Portuguese):
 
Her latest blog post:
 
Find Cecilia on Social Media:
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Observee’s checklist – surviving an observed lesson

Observations
9568156463_1809c97b21_o

Under Creative commons by AJC from Flickr.

In this episode of the TEFL Show podcasts we talk about every teacher’s nightmare – observed lessons. Having survived many formal observations during our careers, we suggest an observee’s checklist: a list of tips that will not only help you survive an observed lesson, but actually do well on it too. Among other things we look at classroom management, giving instructions, monitoring and board work.

What do you think? Do you find observations useful? Have you had any really good or particularly bad ones? Can you give any more tips to add to the checklist? Looking forward to your comments.

You might also be interested in listening to this interview with Anthony Ash, where with a slightly more critical eye we look at lesson plans, observations and professional development programs.

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Lesson plans, observations and PD programs – Interview with Anthony Ash

Observations
Photo by David Muir under Creative Commons from: http://www.doshort.com/4Oyl

Photo by David Muir under Creative Commons from: http://www.doshort.com/4Oyl

In this episode we talk to Anthony Ash about lesson plans, observations and professional development (PD) programs. This podcast was triggered by a post about lesson plans and observations Anthony Ash wrote on his blog which you can read here. We then had a very interesting chat on Twitter (you can still read it here) together with Marc Jones, who also wrote a very interesting post on the topic. As a response to their posts and the Twitter chat, I also wrote an article on my blog where I criticised the insistence on writing long lesson plans for formal observations (read my article here).

So in this podcast we pick up the discussion where we originally left it and continue chatting about the importance of lesson plans and observations in PD programs. We start off by discussing whether preparing a formal lesson plan for an observation should be necessary. We then look at formal observations and chat about their importance in PD programs. We finish off by suggesting what our ideal PD program would look like.

What would your ideal PD program look like? How do you feel about preparing formal lesson plans for observations? Let us know in the comments section or tweet to @theteflshow and @ashowski

About Anthony: I completed the CELTA at IH Wroclaw (Poland) in August 2011 and I completed the DELTA at IH Newcastle (UK) in autumn 2014. I have an MA in English Language and Linguistics in which I focused on the historical development of the English language. I have taught adults and Young Learners general English and Business English in Dresden (Germany), Oxford (UK), Poznan / Torun (Poland) and Buenos Aires (Argentina). I also teach English for Academic Purposes at the University of Newcastle (UK). I have worked in ELT management since September 2013. I was a Senior Teacher at IH Torun (Poland) and I am currently an Assistant Director of Studies at IH Buenos Aires involved in Teacher Training and Development. [bio from Anthony’s blog].

Don’t forget that the podcast is also available on a number of music services. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

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CELTA: some things you need to know

Teacher training

In this episode we give a brief introduction to CELTA, probably the most popular and widely recognised certificate for English language teachers. We start off by describing some of the strengths of the course. In the second half we look at a few shortcomings of the course, and suggest what in our opinion should be changed.

Don’t forget that it’s also available on a number of music services. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

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Observations in ELT: a quality control tool

Observations

In this podcast we talk about being observed. In our own experience observations have mostly been used for quality control purposes and as teachers we have benefited little from many of them. As a result, we suggest how we think observations could be made more useful for teachers in terms of professional development.

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