How to make the most out of conferences

Conferences, Uncategorized

After over a year of not podcasting, we’re back with a new episode 🙂

In this podcast we talk about how you can make the most out of conferences. Both me and Rob have been to numerous conferences as presenters and attendees. And recently Rob has helped co-organise the EAP in Ireland conference. So we want to share with you our experience and how to benefit most from conferences.

Specifically, in this episode you will learn:

  • Number 1 advice to my former self about conferencing
  • How to network and socialise with others
  • How to reach out to speakers and organise meet-ups at the conference
  • How to choose the right talk for you
  • Behind the scenes of organising a conference and accepting proposals
  • How to get your talk accepted at a conference
  • Top conference proposal mistakes to avoid

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Our favourite ELT blogs (Part 1)

Professional Development

In this episode of the TEFL Show podcasts we look at our 10 favourite ELT blogs.

Here are the links to the blogs we discussed in this episode:

What are your favourite ELT blogs? Let us know in the comments section.

Don’t forget that the podcasts are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on YouTube. Just click on one of the logos below to listen to the podcasts on your favourite music service.

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International Language Symposium 2017

Conferences

Did you know that Brno is in the geographical centre of Europe? And did you know that it’s becoming the new Silicon Valley of Central Europe?

If you didn’t, then you’re in for a treat – in this episode I talk to Erik Dostal, who is the owner of CA Institute, a language school in Brno in Czech Republic. Among other things, we talk about the ELT scene in Czech Republic and how it’s changed over the years, the importance of professional development, as well as the market demand for ‘native speakers’ and why school directors need to try to educate their clients out of possible prejudices against ‘non-native speaker’ teachers.

And last but not least, we also talk about the International Language Symposium, which will be held in Brno on June 1-3, and which Erik is organising. Tickets are still available, and there’s a fantastic line-up of speakers, including Stephen Krashen, so check out their website for more information.

Don’t forget that the podcasts are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on YouTube. Just click on one of the logos below to listen to the podcasts on your favourite music service.

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Native speakerism and the complexity of personal experience: a duoethnographic study

Issues in ELT

‘Native speakers’ are better at teaching speaking and should be given conversational and high level classes, right? They can’t tell a verb from a noun, though, so don’t ask them to teach any grammar.

‘Non-native speakers’ know the grammar better and since they know the students’ L1, they should teach lower levels, right? They’re never proficient enough, though, so don’t give them advanced groups.

Stereotypes, misconceptions and prejudices about ‘native’ and ‘non-native speaker’ teachers such as the ones above are rife in our profession. If you join any discussion on the topic, you’re bound to see more than one.

When we talk about native speakerism, we also frequently think that it always benefits ‘native speakers’. They get better jobs. They’re paid more. They get to travel around the world. However, this is just one side of the coin.

While native-speakerism has gained much attention in recent years, the complex ways in which it influences the lives and career trajectories of individual teachers has often been overlooked. So in this podcast Marek Kiczkowiak and Robert Lowe from the TEFLology podcast question some of the assumptions about ‘native’ and ‘non-native speakers’, as well as about native speakerism.

The podcast is based on a paper they recently coauthored entitled “Native-speakerism and the complexity of personal experience: A duoethnographic study”, which was published in the journal Cogent Education. In it, they take an innovative dialogic approach where the voices and personal experiences of the two authors come to the fore.

The article is open access which means anyone anywhere can access, download and share it completely for free. You can read the article here, or by copying and pasting this link to your browser: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2331186X.2016.1264171

And if you enjoyed it, please Tweet it, Facebook it, Instagram it: social-media it around. And leave us a comment here too. We’d love to hear what you think.

Reference:

Lowe, R.J. & Kiczkowiak, M. (2016). Native-speakerism and the complexity of personal experience: A duoethnographic study. Cogent Education 3 (1): 1254171. Available on-line: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2331186X.2016.1264171

Don’t forget that the podcasts are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on YouTube. Just click on one of the logos below to listen to the podcasts on your favourite music service.

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6 things you should know about teaching pronunciation

Pronunciation

The more ‘native-like’ the pronunciation, the better, right? Well, not necessarily. In this episode we take a look at English as a Lingua Franca research into pronunciation and discuss 6 things that every English teacher should know about teaching pronunciation.

If you’re interested in learning more about teaching pronunciation, take a look at Marek’s on-line course How to teach pronunciation: the ELF perspective. A 6 step practical guide for English teachers. And since we really value and appreciate the time you spent listening to the podcast, Marek’s prepared an exclusive 70% discount just for you. On top of this, you’ll get lifetime access to the course and a 30 day money back guarantee, no questions asked.

Some of the things that you will learn in the course:

  • how ELF perspective influences our view of teaching pronunciation;
  • which pronunciation features we should focus more on in class and why;
  • which pronunciation features might hinder intelligibility in international contexts;
  • why ‘non-native speakers’ can be great pronunciation models;
  • how to adapt your course book;
  • what to consider before adopting the ELF perspective;
  • how to raise awareness of ELF in the classroom;
  • how to create your own pronunciation materials.

You can also take a sneak peek inside the course before you decide here as well as preview two other lectures, by going to the course home page, scrolling to the curriculum and clicking on the ‘preview’ button. And below is a short video where Marek tells you a bit more about the course and how it’s structured. Ready to give your pronunciation teaching a boost?

If you enjoyed this episode, please give us a like and a share, and maybe leave a comment too. Don’t forget that the podcasts are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on YouTube. Just click on one of the logos below to listen to the podcasts on your favourite music service.

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Using netspeak.org to teach collocations

Technology

In this video I show you how you can use netspeak.org to teach collocations in your classes. The website is great for raising students awareness of lexical chunks, and once you’ve introduced it, students can use it independently both in and outside class to improve their vocabulary. The video was inspired by this blog post written by Leo Selivan. I’d recommend reading it for more ideas how you can use the website in your classes.

Don’t forget that all our podcasts are also available on a number of music services, and the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

 

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Trinity DipTESOL – units 3 and 4: phonology and teaching practice

Teacher training

In this episode of the TEFL Show, Robert William McCaul interviews Sinead Laffan, an instructor on the DipTESOL, and Austin Weaver, who successfully completed the Dip a few years back, about Unit 3 and Unit 4 of the course. The two interviewees will give you an overview of these two units of the course and share some useful tips. So the episode should be interesting both for those who are already doing the DipTESOL and those who are thinking of enrolling in the future.

If you enjoyed this episode, please give us a like and a share, and maybe leave a comment too. Don’t forget that the podcasts are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on YouTube. Just click on one of the logos below to listen to the podcasts on your favourite music service.

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Using Zotero for citing and referencing

Technology

One of the key skills EAP (English for Academic Purposes) students need to learn is how to cite and reference. Doing this correctly can prove to be really difficult and time-consuming, because every referencing style (e.g. Harvard, APA, Chicago, etc.) has a different set of rules. While you can add citations and a reference list manually, there is free software out there that will significantly reduce the amount of work involved. One of such programs is Zotero and in this video I wanted to show you some of its basic features.

When teaching EAP, I get the students to watch the video at home before the class when we practise referencing. I also ask them to download the program and note down any questions or doubts they have. This reduces the teaching time in class and we can get straight into practice.

If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you shared it, rated it or left a comment. Don’t forget that all our podcasts are also available on a number of music services, and the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service.

 

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Interview with Cecilia Nobre

Cecilia Nobre, Commuter bus classroom, Conferences, DELTA, EFL, Second Language Acquisition, Teacher training, Teachers' Stoires, Uncategorized
In this episode of the TEFL show Robert William McCaul interviews Cecilia Nobre,  an ESOL teacher, a regular conference speaker and blogger, about a novel way she was involved in to learn English on that long commute to work!
We also chat about her experiences as a language learner & how she managed to learn English so well, why she’s learning Czech now and how she’s helping non-native English teachers improve their proficiency.
Cecilia, from Brazil, has been teaching since 1999. She graduated with a BA in Portuguese and English and went on to live in the UK for 3 years where she taught Portuguese. She’s done a postgraduate course in English and she’s been teaching 1:1 online for 3 months and is developing her career as an online teacher. She is particularly interested in materials design and applying Corpus L in ELT contexts (classroom and digital materials)
She also chose and developed the materials for ‘English on the Road’ (Business Result by Oxford and I created the course syllabus)
See the commuter bus/ classroom news report (in Portuguese):
 
Her latest blog post:
 
Find Cecilia on Social Media:
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Trinity DipTESOL – tips for Unit 1 and Unit 2

Teacher training

In this episode we look at Trinity DipTESOL in more detail, focusing on Unit 1 and Unit 2. The former unit checks the candidate knowledge of SLA and ELT theory including such topics as second language acquisition and teaching methodology. Unit 2 on the other hand is assessed through three action research projects where the candidate can choose and then research their area of focus.
As the two invited guests we have Nicola Meldrum, who is a trainer on the Dip, and Keava O’Brien, who is just about to finish the course. So we’ll hear two perspectives on the course: that of an instructor and that of a trainee.

About the guests:

{FD6E4FC7-3F1D-4F3B-AB0D-2EB2F2CF8970}My name is Keava O’Brien and I moved to Barcelona six years ago to do my CELTA, fell in love with the city and have been living here since! I work in a language academy in the city centre and teach adults. I’m currently a trainee on the DipTESOL and, fingers crossed (!), will finish the course in September 2016.

 

13713435_10153502300032396_889033672_nNicola Meldrum has been involved in ELT since 1999. She is a teacher trainer, writer and designs and tutors online teacher development courses. She is currently based in Barcelona where she is course director on a Trinity Dip TESOL course at OxfordTefl. She is also a Trinity Dip TESOL examiner. She specializes in teacher development and action research and has given talks recently on this subject for Iatefl and the British Council in Mexico and Algeria.

If you enjoyed this episode, please give us a like and a share, and maybe leave a comment too. You might also be interested in the other episode about DipTESOL and the one about DELTA. Don’t forget that all the episodes are available on a number of music services, while the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below, kick back, relax and listen to a few episodes.

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