Using netspeak.org to teach collocations

Technology

In this video I show you how you can use netspeak.org to teach collocations in your classes. The website is great for raising students awareness of lexical chunks, and once you’ve introduced it, students can use it independently both in and outside class to improve their vocabulary. The video was inspired by this blog post written by Leo Selivan. I’d recommend reading it for more ideas how you can use the website in your classes.

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Using Memrise – how to create effective mems

Learning languages, Technology

Memrise is all about mems. They’re mnemonic devices that can help you remember a new word or phrase. Like the one below:

So in this video I show you how to create mems on Memrise. I start off by explaining what memes are and how they can help you remember new words. I also give a few examples of effective memes and explain what makes them effective.

 

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How to use the Memrise app – a quick tutorial

Learning languages, Technology

In the last few videos I talked about different features of the website, such as how to create a course for your learners, and you can watch the videos here. However, the app for Android and iPhones is quite different from the way the website is set up, so in this video I will show you how to use it. The tutorial should be useful both for those who have used Memrise app or website in the past, as well as those who are completely new to it.

If you’re planning to use the app with your students (as I’m doing at the moment), you can get them to watch the tutorial at home before class. I found that it really reduces the time you’d need to otherwise spend on explaining how the app works in class.

If you want to find out a bit more about Memrise, you can check out the other video tutorials which are available on YouTube here. The course English for Academic Purposes that you can see in the video can be found here.

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Memrise – a few features that make it a really useful language learning tool

Learning languages, Technology

In the previous video I showed you how to create a vocabulary course for your students on Memrise, which is a free website and an app for learning languages. I’ve used it myself as a language learner and with my students, and I think it can be a very powerful and fun tool for learning languages. So in this episode, I go over a couple of key features which make Memrise stand out from the crowd of language learning websites and apps.

Check out the previous video about Memrise if you want to get some tips for creating a vocabulary course for your learners.

If you want to find out a bit more about Memrise, you can check out two other articles that I’ve written about it:

Don’t forget that all our podcasts are also available on a number of music services, and the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

 

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Memrise – creating a course for your learners

Learning languages, Technology

In this video I show you how to create a vocabulary course for your students on Memrise, which is a free website and an app for learning languages. I’ve used it myself as a language learner and with my students, and I think it can be a very powerful and fun tool for learning languages. So if you haven’t used it yet, or haven’t got around to using it with your learners, then this video is definitely for you.

If you want to find out a bit more about Memrise, you can check out two other articles that I’ve written about it:

Don’t forget that all our podcasts are also available on a number of music services, and the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

 

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Teaching lexically, materials writing and the CELTA – interview with Hugh Dellar

Issues in ELT

In this episode we talk to Hugh Dellar, an experienced teacher, teacher trainer and materials writer. We start off by discussing the lexical approach, what it is, how it differs from other ELT approaches and how teachers can utilise it. We then go on to talk about Hugh’s books ‘Outcomes’ and ‘Teaching lexically’, co-written with Andrew Walkley, and his latest project: London Language Lab – a language school right in the heart of London. We finish off by discussing Hugh’s recent post about the CELTA course and why it might promote native speakers.

As always, we’re looking forward to your comments. Do you see yourself as a lexical teacher? Why (not)? Do you think CELTA promotes native speakers? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

hughHugh Dellar is a teacher and teacher trainer with over twenty years’ experience in the field. He is also the co-founder of Lexical Lab and co-author of two five-level General English series, Innovations and Outcomes (now in its second edition), both published by National Geographic Learning. His first methodology book, Teaching Lexically, is due out via Delta Publishing in July this year 2016 and he also co-runs a quality language school in central London – London Language Lab.

Don’t forget that all our podcasts are also available on a number of music services, and the videos are on our YouTube channel. Just click on one of the logos below to be redirected the service. If you enjoyed one of the episodes, we would appreciate if you rated it or left a comment.

 

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Language learning myths

Learning languages
Under Creative Commons from: https://flic.kr/p/5uJVxM

Under Creative Commons from: https://flic.kr/p/5uJVxM

Continuing with our myth busting theme from this podcast about teaching methods and this one with Russ Mayne, in this episode of The TEFL Show we use our own language learning experience to debunk some of the most common myths and misconceptions about learning languages, such as that you need talent or a very long time to get to a high level. We also give several tips that will hopefully boost your language learning progress. If you’d like to get more language learning tips, you might want to listen to this podcast.

What do you think? Are there any other myths about language learning that need debunking? What’s your experience with learning languages been like? Leave us a comment below.

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Apps for learning and teaching English with @joedale

Technology
Under Creative Commons from: https://flic.kr/p/dQLaR4

Under Creative Commons from: https://flic.kr/p/dQLaR4

In this episode of The TEFL Show we’ve invited Joe Dale to have a chat about different apps for teaching and learning languages. Joe is an independent languages consultant and recognised expert on technology and language learning. He introduces several great apps which, among many other things, can be used for creating content in class, getting students to speak, revising vocabulary, giving students feedback and various self-study activities.

Some of the apps that we discussed in this podcast include: Bossjock junior, Yakyt kids, Balloon stickies plus, Opinion app, 30 hands, Book creator, Picolage, Cahoots, Memrise and Quizlet. Which apps do you regularly use? Have you got any tried and tested ones? We’d love to hear from you, so please leave us a comment below.

5B30F60EB39248828A656DA6946131B2 [2806397]Joe Dale is an independent languages consultant from the UK who works with a range of organisations such as Network for Languages, ALL, The British Council, the BBC, Skype, Microsoft and The Guardian. He was host of the TES MFL forum for six years, former SSAT Languages Lead Practitioner, a regular conference speaker and recognised expert on technology and language learning. He has spoken at conferences and run training courses in Europe, North America, South America, the Middle East, the Far East and Australia . He was a member of the Ministerial Steering Group on languages for the current UK government and advised on the Linguanet Worldwide project for The Language Company. He created ICT activities for the new Institut Français, ALL and Network for Languages Primary French Niveau Bleu course and was short-listed for a NAACE Impact Award in 2013 too. Joe was recently described in a Guardian article as an ‘MFL guru’ and ‘the man behind the #mfltwitterati. He tweets @joedale and can be contacted by email at joedale@talk21.com

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Classroom practices: too much or not enough?

Methodology

Even experienced teachers can become prisoners of their own teaching habits and beliefs, overusing certain approaches, while completely overlooking others. As a result, in this podcast we talk about things that in our opinion we as teachers should do less often in an EFL classroom, and some things that we think we don’t do enough of and should do much more often. Among other things we look at: grammar based vs lexical syllabus, teaching individual words vs teaching chunks, responding to students needs vs following the syllabus, teacher talking time.

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Should Native Speakers take proficiency tests?

Exams

In this The TEFL Show podcast we discuss whether Native English Speakers (NES) should also be required to provide an official proof of their language proficiency. What triggered the podcast was the fact that more and more English-speaking countries (e.g. Australia) require both NES and Non-Native English Speakers (NNES) to prove their proficiency in English by sitting an internationally recognised exam, e.g. IELTS. Another trigger was what happened to Marek recently. When applying for a PhD in a British university, he was asked to provide results of a proficiency test taken within the last two years. This was despite the fact he’d done his BA in English, completed CELTA, DELTA and that he’s an IELTS examiner, which we think is enough to prove he’s highly proficient. If his passport were British, though, there would have been no need to take any exam, because, supposedly, all NES are always completely proficient. Or are they?

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